Clinical supervision

Through clinical supervision, Michelle guides counsellors to reflect on their therapeutic techniques, clinical decisions, and emotional reactions to client issues. This reflective practice helps counsellors gain self-awareness, recognize blind spots, and refine their skills. It also promotes the counsellor’s emotional wellbeing by addressing the potential impact of the therapeutic work on their own mental health.

What is clinical supervision in counselling?

Clinical supervision for counsellors is a structured process that supports and enhances the professional development and practice of mental health practitioners.

Using a collaborative and educational approach, supervision aims to improve the quality of client care, while ensuring ethical standards and competence in the field of counselling.

During clinical supervision, counsellors receive guidance and feedback from experienced supervisors, who are typically licensed and trained in counselling or related disciplines. The process involves regular meetings to discuss cases, ethical dilemmas and personal challenges the counsellor encounters in their practice. Providing a safe and non-judgmental space, the supervisor offers insights, perspectives, and evidence-based strategies to address issues effectively.

Ultimately, clinical supervision empowers counsellors to deliver competent, ethical and culturally sensitive services to their clients. It encourages professional growth, fosters accountability, and enhances the overall effectiveness of counselling interventions.

About Michelle as a supervisor

Michelle is listed on the PACFA National Register as a PACFA Accredited Supervisor and Clinical Counsellor, whose practice includes the provision of professional supervision to counsellors and/or psychotherapists.

She has provided professional counselling in Melbourne since 2007, including 14 years as a PACFA Clinical Registrant, and has been engaged in health and wellbeing practices for more than three decades.

Michelle has completed supervision trainings with Daphne Hewson, Philip Armstrong, Clark Baim, Jenny Dwyer and Michael Carrol. As Clinical Practice Manager, she was responsible for organisation-wide clinical supervision, client-at-risk management, and learning and development for family counsellors, school counsellors, family services practitioners, out of home care practitioners, alcohol and other drug workers, refugee resettlement workers, family dispute resolution practitioners, parenting orders program practitioners, and school refusal clinicians.

Michelle also has extensive experience leading groups and working as a mentor, coach, counsellor and yoga teacher.